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20121101
20121130
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WETA 20
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English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
foundation and union bank. >> at union bank our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> this is bbc world news america reporting from washington. i'm kathy kay. armed with new job numbers and old attack lines, the two candidates for president begin their final pitches. the new york marathon cancelled amid suffering after sandy. residents of staten island say they've been forgotten. >> this is new york city, the financial capital of the world. putting right what's happened here is going to take many months and maybe longer. >> and getting ready for new leaders in china. tonight we continue our series of special reports on the challenges they'll face. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. with just four days to go before the u.s. presidential election, a new jobs report is fueling arguments on t
our president is and what he's willing to do for us, we are even more excited about getting him re-elected. >> this morning we hit 600 houses. this afternoon we probably hit about 20 or 0 houses. not everybody was home but enough people were home that we were able to spread the word. >> woodruff: we assess the polls and the state of the race on election eve with stuart rothenberg, susan page, and andrew kohut. >> ifill: lawyers gear up to monitor polling stations tomorrow. what will they find? jeffrey brown takes a look. >> woodruff: and from legalizing marijuana to gay marriage andllt measures worth watching. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. w major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: all its own. with united health care, i got help that fit my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never miss a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. united health care. >> computing surrounds us. sometimes i
criminal fine in u.s. history. we examine the legal resolution of the gulf coast spill, two years later. >> suarez: science correspondent miles o'brien asks an age old question. why do we sleep? the answer comes from an unlikely underwater source. >> no, you don't need more sleep? you're getting plenty of sleep right? are you getting plenty of sleep? yes. >> brown: china's new leader will head both the communist party and the military. we assess the change at the top in beijing. >> suarez: and we close with the story of volunteers stepping up to help victims of hurricane sandy in the borough of queens in new york. >> there's people who have been without attention for a long time. some with, some without running water. definitely without power. you know, so as time goes, it gets worse. and i'm afraid if we don't like, really get this situation under control. >> brow that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supportin
to get this economy going. >> woodruff: we have two takes on the battle for the u.s. senate, beginning with the big money being spent in the most competitive races. we talk with npr's tamara keith. >> brown: and from arizona, we have the story of a former surgeon general challenging a six-term congressman for an open seat. >> woodruff: plus on the daily download, margaret warner looks at another way to reach out to voters with last minute messages on twitter. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the losses in life and property kept growing today, in the wake of "sandy". the death toll reached 92 and the focus on physical damage shifted to new jersey, where the monster storm blasted barrier islands and other
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: general john allen, the top u.s. commander in afghanistan, is under investigation for sending messages to a woman linked to the scandal that forced c.i.a. director petraus to resign. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on what were termed "potentially inappropriate" e- mails and documents, and we examine if and when the white house and congress should have been alerted. >> ifill: then, the senate and the house of representatives get back to work. judy woodruff looks at the long list of challenges ahead. >> brown: one item on the agenda is the so-called fiscal cliff , and that was the focus of a white house meeting today with liberal leaders. we talk with two participants. >> ifill: plus, from "our food for nine billion" series, spst giepma r oadtsinorchn sa' magistad reports on china's moves to satisfy a growing demand for meat. it has transformed lives and diets over the past 30 years meat con suption per cap to has quadrupled and citdwellers eat
to let go now... i won't. i'd just float off, you know. i won't. come on. no use putting off the inevitable. are you going to tell her or shall i? oh, i... i think it's best coming from me. blenkinsopp! oh! oh, dear! oh, dear. bundle won't like that at all. but you're not selling chimneys? virginia: well, bundle couldn't bear to stay on, and i don't want to live here, so, what do you think? pass the whole headache on to blenkinsopp and her tea and scones. why not? will she be all right? bundle, i mean. virginia: oh, she'll foist herself onto some undeserving cause. miss marple: her father? i suppose. and you? here they come. a happy marriage. it can't be that difficult, can it? go with your heart. like mother? i keep thinking if she loved her count so much, why was she so quick to believe he'd run off? i suppose love is an act of courage. yes. miss marple. good-bye, inspector. thank you. i see now i've grown too fond of my own reputation. i was so bewitched by the blasted diamond. and now look at me. the latest of your casualties. what do you think? oh... interpol want me to
in need of a spark find one in october? u.s. employers across nearly all sectors were hiring, for a net gain of 171,000 new jobs. the labor department also revised its august and september figures higher, by 84,000. all told, it signaled slow but steady growth, and it was news that president obama wanted to play up in the campaign's final weekend, especially in one critical state. >> "oh (io), oh (io)" >> brown: the president made three stops in the buckeye state, starting in hilliard, just outside columbus. >> in 2008, we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. and today, our businesses have created nearly five and a half million new jobs. and this morning, we learned that companies hired more workers in october than at any time in the last eight months. ( applause ) >> brown: and the trend line seemed promising, as well. since july, the economy has added an average of 173,000 jobs per month, up from just 67,000 a month in the spring. at the same time, though, the unemployment rate ticked up a tenth of a point in october to 7.9% as more
and corruption against the u.s. and on the taiwan issue and against japan, so the congress has taken place against a backdrop of rising military influence. >> rose:. >> and if i could ask richard on that to me it was a sign of some kind of order in the chinese process, rather than disorder to have this clean handover, the chairman of the military commission of not having jintao hang around for a year or two, it is a modest step of transparency and institutionalization? >> i think you can definitely argue that this basically reflects well on the system, they don't have the former leading hanging on by his fingernails in another important post, that is true. but -- and that is why some people compliment jintao for respecting the process but in ordinary power politics term, it certainly shows that jintao was a much weaker leader than we thought. >> we have never seen foreign policy statements from li keqiang be, scituate. >> we don't know how assertive the military should be. >> rose: reform. >> we don't know, that's what really comes -- and you have one of the best in the world, but at the s
with us again, for analysis, are mark shields and david brooks. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshoovidided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: for the first time in four years, president obama did not have to worry about re-election today. still, there was little time to savor tuesday's victory, in the face of a potential fiscal crisis at the end of the year. "newshour" correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage on this day after the election of 2012. >> reporter: mr. obama departed his hometown of chicago this afternoon for washington, his home for another four years. waiting for him: a still- divided congress now facing a critical lame duck session. the president made it clear in his victory speech last night that he thinks the country wants an end to gr
daily operations. >> susie: that and more tonight on nbr! >> tom: u.s. markets turned their attention back to the economy today; investors and traders liked what they heard. americans are feeling the most optimistic they have been in nearly five years about their finances and the outlook for the economy. the conference board's confidence index jumped to a reading of 72.2 last month. driving that gain, an improving job market. new claims for unemployment insurance fell by 9,000 in the past week to 363,000, showing ctur urct we'll have more on jobs in a moment. uras for stocks, the dow gained 136 points, the nasdaq was up 42, the s&p adding 15. >> susie: but economists say that encouraging report on jobless claims and the confidence survey were collected before hurricane sandy. meanwhile, the effects of the monster storm are paralyzing much of new jersey and new york city here's an update: four and a half million people are still without power, and it could take another ten days before power is restored. limited flights have resumed at all of the airports in the new york area. public sc
's unemployment rate as we head into the final weekend before the election. u.s. businesses added 171,000 jobs in october across many industries. four days after sandy, the gas crunch in jersey, access to cash in the northeast and controversy nixes sunday's running of the new york city marathon. that and more tonight on "n.b.r.!" we begin with jobs. employers beefed up their payrolls last month, adding more jobs than expected as more americans counted themselves among the labor force. the official labor department count shows 171,000 jobs were created last month. that's much stronger than the 125,000 analysts were looking for. and the government revised its september new job count up to 148,000. thanks to more people looking for work, the unemployment rate rose slightly to 7.9%. darren gersh has the story from washington d.c. >> reporter: the october employment report makes it clear a jobs recovery is solidly underway. >> i think the key message there is that employment growth has been taken up a notch. over the last three months we've added over 170,000 jobs on average. that's a little bit be
in iowa an nevada with the early vote which tells us a little bit how this thing is starting to break. >> we close this evening with this question what is the impact of the digital revolution on books, writers and publishing. joining me ken auletta, tim o reilly, jonathan safran foer an jane frieman. >> i like the idea of ebooks how they can democratize books. ma what i am afraid of is on platforms that have distracks an are inherently fast makes it harder to make books books. >> it is so important to have historical perspective. you know what we consider the book today is a relatively recent historical phenomenon. i totally disagree that homer would recognize the book. you know actually we probably more recognize the ebook. >> rose: hurricane sandy, politics and publishing when we continue. >> orngun fch e rliose was provided by the following: c captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> this has been a difficult week for the city of new york four days after hurricane sandy made landfall life has not yet returned to normal.
to close in the east and the south. in fact, six states closed just txilient ago at the theng using exit polling data and surveys of early voters, the associated press is beginning to project a winner in a number of states. we're going to be watching for that as soon as we get it. i'm told, gwen, we do have one call. the networks, two television networks are projecting the state of kentucky will go for mitt romney which is not a surprise. a state that john mccain won four years ago. >> ifill: not a big surprise. all of these results will-jump-starting the all-important electoral college count. 270 is the magic number one candidate has to reach to become the next president. right now the associated press is predicting nothing because we don't know yet what is going to happen with those electoral votes. but we're waiting. >> woodruff: i just now am being told, gwen, and this information is coming in as we're sitting here. the state of indiana has been projected. mitt romney is projected the winner in the state of indiana. that is a state barack obama wol narrowly but he did win it four yea
police officers there to guide us through the mobs of people at the site. >> narrator: it was 47-year-old mitt romney's first campaign. >> and mitt just has this big smile on his face, and he looks at me and goes, "boy, however this turns out, this really makes it worth it." >> narrator: the race had been close. romney needed a great performance. >> i don't think he had any idea what it was going to be like, because he had never done debates under that pressure. >> narrator: he'd gotten into the race because kennedy looked weak, beatable. >> at the time ted kennedy seemed vulnerable. it was a weak period for kennedy. he looked bad, he sounded bad, and in that way he was vulnerable. >> narrator: he was dramatically overweight. there had been trouble with alcohol and women. he'd mortgaged his house to stay in the race. >> romney was everything ted kennedy was not. you know, he had this clean family life. he was a really good speaker. he was really athletic and he had a good kind of campaign visage. >> people knew that he had gone to harvard business school, had made a lot of money, been
, and the hunt for fuel heats up. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the u.s. presidential election is just one day away, and that was the hot topic here on wall street. but investors were still cautious about making major moves ahead of the election, so stocks posted just modest gains, and trading volume was light. the dow rose 19 points, the nasdaq added 17, and the s&p up three points. but, where stocks go from here may depend on who wins the white house tomorrow night. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: wall street is hardly back to normal, with reminders of hurricane sandy still obvious everywhere. but, at least the presidential election could provide a distraction for those coping with the storm's aftermath. the question is will the stock market continue to distract in the days following tomorrow's big contest? that may depend on its outcome. like many on wall street, nyse trader jonathan corpina predicts a mitt romney win will be a big win for stock prices. >> i think when you see new regimes, new presidents come in to play in sort of a turmoil time, that change is
frequency, for to us sit here today and say, "well, this is once in a generation and it's not going to happen again," i think would be shortsighted and i think we need to anticipate more of these extreme weather-type situations in the future. and we have to take that's into consideration in reform, mottifying our infrastructure, our built environment. >> rose: new york city mayor michael bloomberg began and ended his briefing at city hall with words to those who lost hay loved one in the hurricane. new yorkers everywhere joined him extending their thoughts to the victims of disaster. >> everyone here hearts go out to the families of those who lost family in the storm and those who lost their homes. our thoughts and prayers are with everyone and we certainly will give our full support in the next weeks and months to those hurt by the storm. >> rose: we turn to an interview we taped earlier this week with the actor denzel washington. and director bob zemeckis. >> it all comes down to the script for me. when i read a screen play that i can't put down, and when i read a screen play that
on reporting this story. >> the most important thing i've learned is really how vulnerable so much us are. you don't have to report the story, you just need to look at the tv and sandy over the last few days. what's so amazing about the storm was the sheer size. it struck 50, 60 million americans and did so almost simultaneously and that really truly taxed the ability of any society to respond to that. you couldn't borrow personnel, new york couldn't take personnel from new jersey or connecticut because everyone was going to be hit at once. we're all in this together and you have to accept that fact. >> rose: there's this question also which is the argument that's been made over the last years with increasing velocity. it is that cyber attacks could produce some of the same results we're experiencing today by being able to damage the electric grid in an even more severe way. >> yes, absolutely. that's a scary thought. we've seen just what life is like with a few million people without power. you can see the grid go down in a large way, if it was not easy to put it back together again. of cou
. it was these two pieces of paper that mrs. vanderlyn used to blackmail him. she said, however, she would exchange them for the plans of the kestrel. >> oh, tom. >> if he were seen to hand over those plans to mrs. vanderlyn, he would be ruined, anyway. so, it had to look as if somebody had stolen them. and although he tried to persuade us that he saw this mysterious figure on the terrace, it was monsieur mayfield himself who stole those plans. it was the safest way. and they were securely in his pocket throughout the whole farce of mrs. vanderlyn's arrest. >> and you keep saying everything's going to be all right. >> it will, darling. you-- >> let me pass! let me pass! >> please, sir george-- >> i've had enough of this, mayfield! what's going on? i've been kept totally in the dark! >> no, no, no, no, sir george. the germans have got the missing papers. >> what? >> and you, monsieur carlisle, i imagine you know this, as well as anyone. >> [sigh] the german high command now has plans of our new fighter, on which they'll have to wait six months of concentrated effort before they realize they've been
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)